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‘It felt like I had a terrible tumour’




Kaye Adams has revealed she rushed herself to hospital after being convinced she had a tumour. 

The Loose Women star, 61, filled in fans on her ‘traumatic’ health scare in an Instagram post on Sunday as she admitted she was left fearing the worst after losing all hearing in her ear. 

She revealed that she was left ‘absolutely terrified’ after putting in her earpiece for Friday’s panel show and not being able to hear anything, recalling: ‘I thought, ‘Oh my god, what has gone wrong?”‘

While she managed to get through the show, she was ‘panicking’ throughout and after looking up her systems online she headed to her local A&E. 

She praised the nurses at hospital for helping to calm her down and who sent her for an audiogram at a nearby Boots hearing centre, where the cause of her hearing loss proved to be incredibly simple. 

Kaye Adams filled in fans on her ‘traumatic’ health scare in an Instagram post on Sunday as she admitted she was left fearing the worst after losing all hearing in her ear

Kaye confessed: ‘I am embarrassed to say this because, honestly, my head was going to some terrible terrible tumour, I am very melodramatic.

‘[Audiologist] Paula pulled out the biggest bit of wax you have ever seen.’

Thankfully, the removal of the wax helped restore Kaye’s hearing in full. 

Kaye captioned her post: ‘I’ve had the most traumatic 48 hours. Here’s where happened…

‘And a big thank you to @bootsuk and @nhsggc – Anita and Paula you were truly incredible with this melodramatic 61 year old woman!’

For most people, wax moves out of the ear naturally over time, however 2.3 million people a year in the UK require their ear wax to be removed by a professional.

If left untreated, ear wax build-up can lead to temporary hearing loss, tinnitus, earache, a greater risk of infections or dizziness

The NHS website advises putting two to three drops of ‘medical grade olive or almond oil in your ear’ three to four times a day for three to five days to treat it yourself.

The Loose Women star revealed that she was left ‘ absolutely terrified’ after putting in her earpiece for Friday’s panel show and not being able to hear anything
Kaye confessed: ‘I am embarrassed to say this because, honestly, my head was going to some terrible terrible tumour,’ however the cause of her hearing loss was simply ear wax

Kaye is the longest-serving presenter on ITV’s Loose Women and hosts a weekly podcast. 

She lives in Glasgow with her partner, tennis coach Ian Campbell, and their daughters Charley, 21, and Bonnie, 16. 

Last year she revealed that reaching her 60s made her reevaluate her life and she has now vowed to spend less time working and more time enjoying the little things. 

She explained: ‘I love my work and won’t give up completely, but from now on I’ll be doing less. I can’t remember the last time I didn’t work during a weekend or on holiday.

‘I enjoy it, so it’s not like I’ve been suffering, but it will be nice to have some genuinely free time where I wake up and think: “what I am going to do today?”‘

WHAT CAUSES HEARING LOSS? AND CAN IT BE TREATED? 

Hearing loss can be temporary or permanent.

It can also develop gradually with age or come on suddenly.

Hearing loss in just one ear may be due to a build up of wax, an infection or a burst eardrum.

Sudden loss in both ears may be due to damage from a very loud noise or side effects of certain medication.

Gradual hearing loss may be the result of fluid building up, known as glue ear; a bony growth, called otosclerosis; or skin cell accumulation, known as cholesteatoma.

Gradual hearing loss in both ears is usually caused by ageing or exposure to loud noises over many years.

Hearing loss sometimes gets better on its own.

A build up of wax can also be treated by being suctioned out or softened with drops.

However, hearing loss can also be permanent, with treatment then focusing on making the most of the hearing that remains.

This may involve:

  • Hearing aids
  • Implants – attach to the skull or are placed deep in the ear, if hearing aids are ineffective
  • Communicating via sign language or lip reading

Hearing loss can be prevented by avoiding loud music and wearing headphones that block out background noise.

Ear defenders should also be worn if you work in a noisy environment, such as a building site.

And ear protection should be worn at concerts and other noisy events. 

Source: NHS Choices 



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