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The Age former economics editor and political journalist Tim Colebatch dies, aged 75


He served for many years as the newspaper’s economics editor and commentator until his resignation in 2013.

Tim Colebatch was a respected journalist. Penny Stephens

He started as a cadet journalist in 1971, just when the newspaper industry was poised to enter an era of new journalism as Australia edged towards massive political and societal change. The Age was among the first mainstream newsrooms to ride the zeitgeist, and circulation vaulted as new readers from the Baby Boom generation entered the workforce.

“His impressive intellect was frequently called upon during some of journalism’s toughest assignments, from his part exposing land deal corruption in the Hamer government to helping the public understand some of the most profound economic reforms in modern history,” Age editor Patrick Elligett said.

Age readers, and indeed the wider Australian public, owe him gratitude for his services to democracy over several decades.”

Colebatch, the son of a pioneering paediatric oncologist John Colebatch, was born in Melbourne in 1949 and attended Melbourne Grammar School, before studying arts and economics at the University of Melbourne.

He was among the first cohorts of university graduates to enter Australian journalism, and the new politics ushered in with the election of the Whitlam government the following year led to many fresh areas of reporting such as immigration, religion and investigative journalism. Colebatch was The Age’s first reporter to cover the environment.

He reported on state politics during the halcyon days of the Hamer government and joined The Age’s Insight team when investigative journalism was new. He reported on the early corruption that had started to appear in the long-serving Coalition government.

A gentle man with a curious, tough intellect, he stood out from the young reporters of the time and went on to become The Age’s youngest editorial writer after clashing with then editor Graham Perkin over a leader article on the India/Pakistan situation.

Later, Colebatch was appointed the Washington correspondent and reported on the Reagan presidency, before returning home to write about economics from Canberra. He gave treasurers Paul Keating and Peter Costello the sharp end of his insights.

Dick Hamer: The liberal Liberal, by Tim Colebatch Supplied

His strength was numbers, and he brought social and economic statistics alive by relating them to everyday life. Statistics and electoral data were his analytical speciality and his analyses of pre-and post-poll election figures were widely followed and respected.

When he left daily journalism, Colebatch penned a biography, Dick Hamer: the liberal Liberal, capturing the beginning of the Liberal Party’s evolution from being the natural home of “the moral middle class”. He had reported on Hamer as a young journalist and had a deep knowledge of Victorian political history.

Colebatch wrote his last column for The Age, on December 10, 2013. It ended: “My motto is that I don’t care who runs the country, but I care passionately about how it’s run. Our job is to sort the truth from the spin, to help readers through the complexity of issues.”

He and his wife Mary Toomey remained keen bushwalkers, especially around the hills near their Canberra home. From his earliest teenage years, he was a ballboy at the Australian Championships (now the Australian Open), when it was held each summer at Kooyong. He never lost his love for the game, playing regularly at the Edinburgh Gardens courts in North Fitzroy when he lived in Melbourne. He also reported on tennis, including Wimbledon.

He is survived by Mary and their four children.

Cut through the noise of federal politics with news, views and expert analysis from Jacqueline Maley..



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Uncategorized

The Age former economics editor and political journalist Tim Colebatch dies, aged 75


He served for many years as the newspaper’s economics editor and commentator until his resignation in 2013.

Tim Colebatch was a respected journalist. Penny Stephens

He started as a cadet journalist in 1971, just when the newspaper industry was poised to enter an era of new journalism as Australia edged towards massive political and societal change. The Age was among the first mainstream newsrooms to ride the zeitgeist, and circulation vaulted as new readers from the Baby Boom generation entered the workforce.

“His impressive intellect was frequently called upon during some of journalism’s toughest assignments, from his part exposing land deal corruption in the Hamer government to helping the public understand some of the most profound economic reforms in modern history,” Age editor Patrick Elligett said.

Age readers, and indeed the wider Australian public, owe him gratitude for his services to democracy over several decades.”

Colebatch, the son of a pioneering paediatric oncologist John Colebatch, was born in Melbourne in 1949 and attended Melbourne Grammar School, before studying arts and economics at the University of Melbourne.

He was among the first cohorts of university graduates to enter Australian journalism, and the new politics ushered in with the election of the Whitlam government the following year led to many fresh areas of reporting such as immigration, religion and investigative journalism. Colebatch was The Age’s first reporter to cover the environment.

He reported on state politics during the halcyon days of the Hamer government and joined The Age’s Insight team when investigative journalism was new. He reported on the early corruption that had started to appear in the long-serving Coalition government.

A gentle man with a curious, tough intellect, he stood out from the young reporters of the time and went on to become The Age’s youngest editorial writer after clashing with then editor Graham Perkin over a leader article on the India/Pakistan situation.

Later, Colebatch was appointed the Washington correspondent and reported on the Reagan presidency, before returning home to write about economics from Canberra. He gave treasurers Paul Keating and Peter Costello the sharp end of his insights.

Dick Hamer: The liberal Liberal, by Tim Colebatch Supplied

His strength was numbers, and he brought social and economic statistics alive by relating them to everyday life. Statistics and electoral data were his analytical speciality and his analyses of pre-and post-poll election figures were widely followed and respected.

When he left daily journalism, Colebatch penned a biography, Dick Hamer: the liberal Liberal, capturing the beginning of the Liberal Party’s evolution from being the natural home of “the moral middle class”. He had reported on Hamer as a young journalist and had a deep knowledge of Victorian political history.

Colebatch wrote his last column for The Age, on December 10, 2013. It ended: “My motto is that I don’t care who runs the country, but I care passionately about how it’s run. Our job is to sort the truth from the spin, to help readers through the complexity of issues.”

He and his wife Mary Toomey remained keen bushwalkers, especially around the hills near their Canberra home. From his earliest teenage years, he was a ballboy at the Australian Championships (now the Australian Open), when it was held each summer at Kooyong. He never lost his love for the game, playing regularly at the Edinburgh Gardens courts in North Fitzroy when he lived in Melbourne. He also reported on tennis, including Wimbledon.

He is survived by Mary and their four children.

Cut through the noise of federal politics with news, views and expert analysis from Jacqueline Maley..



Source link

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